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Showing posts with the label Leningrad

Prospekt of the 25th of October, Leningrad. January 18, 1943

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Prospekt of the 25th of October, Leningrad. January 18, 1943 / Nevsky prospekt, St. Petersburg. Leningrad women hoisting red banners after the announcement of the breakthrough of the Siege. Alexander Shmidke

Crossing of prospekt of the 25th of October and Volodarsky prospekt, Leningrad. September 1941

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Crossing of prospekt of the 25th of October and Volodarsky prospekt, Leningrad. September 1941/Crossing of Nevsky prospekt and Liteiny prospekt. I took this picture today. Kindergarten group on a walk. The poster reads: "Warrior of the Red Army, save us!" Alexander Shmidke ‎

Zvenigorodskaya street, Leningrad. January 1942 / Zvenigorodskaya street, St. Petersburg.

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Zvenigorodskaya street, Leningrad. January 1942 / Zvenigorodskaya street, St. Petersburg.  In early December 1941 another disaster befell the starving Leningraders: one by one, all communal services stopped functioning. Electricity, running water, central heating and public transport (predominantly trams) were no longer available as fuel stocks ran out. Many trams were caught by the blackout driving along their regular routes in early Dece mber and remained stuck in the ice until spring 1942. The trucks on the Road of Life could not even deliver the minimum daily supply of food of 125 grams for non-working individuals 250 grams for workers, not speaking of coal or oil for power stations. Underground water pipelines somehow remained operational, but there was no power to pump water even to the first floors of apartment buildings. The government cut manual pumps into the pipes or sometimes people found damaged leaking pipes and got water from them. Those who lived close t

Crossing of Ligovsky prospekt and Razyezzhaya street, Leningrad. January, 1942

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Crossing of Ligovsky prospekt and Razyezzhaya street, Leningrad. January, 1942 / Crossing of Ligovsky prospekt and Razyezzhaya street, St. Petersburg. I took this picture today. Soldiers towing a gas-holder with hydrogen for barrage balloons. The poster on the bombed building reads "Death to childkillers!" Alexander Shmidke

Glazovskaya street, Leningrad. September 5, 1941 / Konstantina Zaslonova street, St. Petersburg. I took these pictures today.

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Glazovskaya street, Leningrad. September 5, 1941 / Konstantina Zaslonova street, St. Petersburg. I took these pictures today. According to official records of Leningrad authorities, this was the first residential building in the city to be hit by German heavy artillery on September 5, 1941. The first shellings started one day earlier and the last shot at the city area was made on January 22, 1944. A total of 64 000 heavy artillery shells of 150mm and above were fired on the city in this period. There is no exact statistics on the number of civilians killed by artillery strikes in particular, but about 27 000 died of both air raids and artillery out of the 800 000 estimated civilian deaths. Alexander Shmidke

Zagorodny prospekt, Leningrad

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Zagorodny prospekt, Leningrad. August 1941 / Zagorodny prospekt, St. Petersburg. I took this picture today. Soldiers of Leningrad People's Militia marching to the front. Around 160 000 men volunteered to join the ranks of Leningrad People's Militia, forming 10 rifle divisions. While the units formed in July - early August 1941 were relatively well-equipped and staffed with experienced officers and people with technical skills or prior combat exerience, the ones sent to the front in the desperate days of September 1941 were trade school kids, university students with their professors, white collar workers others and other who often had never served in the army and received barely a couple of weeks of basic training. Alexander Shmidke

Prospekt of the 25th of October, Leningrad. July 1942 / Nevsky prospekt, St. Petersburg.

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Prospekt of the 25th of October, Leningrad. July 1942 / Nevsky prospekt, St. Petersburg. A column of German POWs being marched along the main street of Leningrad. In the end of July 1942 the freshly appointed commander of the Leningrad Front General Govorov conducted 2 minor operations which slightly improved the overall situation along the frontline which remsined static for nearly 10 months. A small German bridgehead near Kolpino was liquidate d in Yam-Izhora and a couple of square kilometers of suburbs were liberated in Uritzk and Staro-Panovo at the southwestern edge of the frontline. The latter operation came as a complete surprise for the Germans, resulting in several dozen prisoners. And yet the city's future was one once again looking bleak and uncertain as German armies were surging relentlessly and unstoppably towards Stalingrad, while the overambitious attempt to lift the siege resulted in about 100 000 Red Army soldiers killed and captured in the Volkho

Dmitrovsky lane, Leningrad.

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Dmitrovsky lane, Leningrad. 1941/Dmitrovsky lane, St. Petersburg, 2019. I found the information about this picture in the memoir of Anatoly Molchanov, a poet from Leningrad, who was 11 when the war started. He lived a couple of blocks away on Pravda street and provided an eyewitness account of what happened. When the air raid warning was announced by radio, about 30 people took shelter in the basement of this house. However, the airbomb which made the big crater visible on th e picture, not only wrecked tram rails and damaged the building, but also bent the basement door and partly barricaded it with rubble. The worst of all was that it burst open underground water pipes and water started pouring through basement windows. Eventually, all those who managed to escape bombs and fire met an unlikely death of drowning. The building was demolished after the war and nothing was built in its place, which was not typical for the city center. Alexander Shmidke ‎

Trams pulled to the middle of the Peterhof highway and made into a barricade against German tanks.

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Trams pulled to the middle of the Peterhof highway and made into a barricade against German tanks. Winter of 1941-1942. 10 km from the Winter Palace as the crow flies. The first photo is a still from "Leningrad in struggle" documentary movie, the second one is from Yandex Maps, and the combination of the two is mine. Alexander Shmidke ‎

Leningrad/St.Petersburg. Corner of Nevsky and Ligovsky prospekts.

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Leningrad/St.Petersburg. Corner of Nevsky and Ligovsky prospekts. Victims of one of the first artillery shellings, September 1941. Alexander Shmidke

Victims of a heavy German artillery shell on the Nevsky prospekt

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Victims of a heavy German artillery shell on the Nevsky prospekt in Leningrad on August 8, 1943. On that day the tram was behind schedule and a big crowd amassed at the stop. In a single explosion 12 people were killed and 43 were wounded. Firefighters hosing the blood off the pavement and MPVO soldiers loading dead bodies on trucks. Alexander Shmidke

Column of BT-5 and BT-7 tanks driving along Obukhovskoy Oborony prospekt. 1943.

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Alexander Shmidke

08.09.1941 - 08.09.2019

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Alexander Shmidke

Mezhdunarodny prospekt, Leningrad. Mid-January 1944 / Moskovsky prospekt, St. Petersburg.

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Mezhdunarodny prospekt, Leningrad. Mid-January 1944 / Moskovsky prospekt, St. Petersburg. I took this picture today. Red Army soldiers at a short break before marching south to the frontline. The House of Soviets can be seen in the background by  Alexander Shmidke